Alaska Command chief sees new units in state's military future

Alaska has a key role to play in support of national defense, and recent developments may enhance that, Lt. Gen. Norton Schwartz, commander of the Alaska Command, told state legislators in Juneau on Jan. 29.

Schwartz also urged lawmakers to be understanding of the need for future base closings even as they support continued operations of Alaska military installations. There are things Alaskans can do to strengthen arguments for maintaining bases here, he added.

Fisheries specialist leaves organic salmon label legacy

Industry advocate Kate Troll has left her job as fisheries specialist with the state Department of Community and Regional Affairs. During her three years on the job, Troll led the charge to make sure wild seafood would be included in new national organic standards.

"Kate not only kept the door open, but went through the door on that one," a co-worker said. Troll also was involved from the beginning with the Marine Stewardship Council’s eco-labeling program, which last year certified Alaska salmon as coming from a healthy fishery.

Staffing insight for non-profits

Nonprofit organizations have become an important part of Alaska’s economy, and many nonprofit board members and staffers are working hard to build expertise and improve their professionalism.

Taking a professional approach to doing one’s job is as important in the nonprofit sector as it is in private businesses. In some ways, it’s even more important, because resources are usually scarce and lost opportunities can interfere with accomplishing a group’s mission.

Networking is key to thriving economies

What makes some regional economies grow faster than others? Recent work by the National Commission on Entrepreneurship reports that 5 to 10 percent of U.S. firms can be called entrepreneurial growth companies. Those companies are responsible for two-thirds of the 240,000 new jobs created each month.

Why do some regions nurture these growth companies better than others?

This Week in Alaska Business History February 11, 2001

Editor’s note: "This Week in Alaska Business History" revisits events that shaped our past.

"Those who cannot

remember the past are

condemned to repeat it."

-- George Santayana, 1863-1952

20 years ago this week

Anchorage Times

Feb. 14, 1981

Large gas field found in reserve south of Barrow

By John Knowlton

Times Writer

The U.S. Geological Survey has made a discovery of what it calls one of the largest natural gas reservoirs ever in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska.

Northwest Cargo grows

The addition of two Boeing 747 freighters and the return of the economy in Asia have Northwest Airlines Cargo in need of more space at the Alaska CargoPort.

Knowles, Rep. Kott offer plans to raise Alaska minimum wage

Gov. Tony Knowles and Rep. Pete Kott, R-Eagle River, think a hike in the state’s minimum wage is long overdue. But restaurant operators say state legislators should think the issue through very carefully. Restaurants, particularly the fast-food sector of the industry, could be severely affected, according to Jack Amon, president of the Alaska Hotel, Motel and Restaurant Association.

Knowles and Kott have both introduced bills raising the current $5.65 per hour minimum wage. Kott’s House Bill 56 was up for a hearing in the House Labor and Commerce Committee, chaired by Rep.

High bids delay Wainwright hospital

Construction of a replacement hospital at Fort Wainwright, expected to be one of the major construction projects in Alaska this year, is on hold after bids came in higher than expected. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Alaska District canceled the solicitation for bids Jan. 26 without awarding a contract.

The project to replace the nearly 50-year-old Bassett Army Hospital was to be completed in 2005.

As tax time begins, here are some strategies

The following items identify planning strategies, tips and facts that could affect your 2000 and 2001 tax liability. Extensive and complicated rules govern the application of many of the items that follow, so please contact a qualified tax professional to see if they can be applied to your personal situation.

Movers & Shakers February 11, 2001

movershakers.jpgRandy Sears has joined Alaska Permanent Capital Management Co. as vice president/senior markets strategist and portfolio manager. Sears most recently served as manager of fixed income investments at the Alaska Permanent Fund Corp. in Juneau. Lisa Sealy has joined APCM as securities operations officer. Sealy previously held positions with Alaska USA Trust Co. and Key Bank Alaska.

Capstone nicked in FAA-union crossfire

Glitches in the FAA’s Anchorage Center software for air traffic control over Alaska became the focus of a union squabble with Federal Aviation Administration management -- but not until two labor groups erroneously discredited the Capstone technology project under way in Alaska.

Bulletin Board February 11, 2001

In gear

 

Around the World February 11, 2001

NATION

Bush delays logging

WASHINGTON -- A ban on road building and most logging in a third of the country’s national forests was delayed for two months on Feb. 5 by the Bush administration.

The forest plan, which President Clinton announced Jan. 4, has been attacked by Republican Western lawmakers, and by energy, timber and mining industries.

The delay is in line with an order President Bush made on taking office last month to halt or slow down a series of regulations and rules the Clinton administration issued in its final days.

Business Profile February 11, 2001

profile.jpgName of the company: Alaska Option Services Corp.

Established: 1983

Location: 949 E. 36th Ave., Anchorage

Telephone: 907-563-0078

Major focus of services: Alaska Option Services Corp. provides shared electronic funds transfer services for automated teller machines and point of sale transactions around the state.

Backbone studies gas line options, offers comparative analysis

The citizens group, Backbone: Standing Up For Alaska’s Future, studied at least 15 variations of potential projects for developing the vast quantities of natural gas on Alaska’s North Slope. The Slope has estimated known gas reserves of 35 trillion cubic feet and another 65 trillion cubic feet of gas reserves yet to be discovered.

Backbone released "Alaska’s Gas, Alaska’s Future," a 130-page study, Jan. 25 that examines various gas pipeline proposals now being considered by Alaska gas producers, state lawmakers and others.

Calendar February 11, 2001

Confabs

Movers & Shakers February 4, 2001

movershakers.jpg Acclaim Technology has hired Jim Henry as account executive for Alaska. Henry will be responsible for both new business and service to existing accounts. Henry has been involved in the Anchorage information technology industry for more than 15 years, and has experience in systems management, telecommunications and technical sales.

Pollock, cod fishing begins with uncertain future in Steller rules

Winter fishing for pollock and cod is under way in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska, thanks to a budget rider pushed through Congress in December by Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska.

The National Marine Fisheries Service published emergency regulations Jan. 20 implementing a new fisheries management plan allowing vessels to start fishing.

"Overall it’s OK, compared with what we thought we would have to live with," under a Biological Opinion published by NMFS on Nov. 30, said Stephanie Madsen, vice president of the Pacific Seafood Processors Association.

Feds OK True North permits

mining.jpg FAIRBANKS -- Permits have been issued for the True North gold mine project, clearing the way to start construction of the project 30 miles north of Fairbanks.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permits issued Jan.24 go into effect immediately.

The permits were the last government approval that Fairbanks Gold Mining Inc. needed.

"We’re very pleased for the company and for the community," Tom Irwin, general manager of Fairbanks Gold Mining, told the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner.

Cruise ship jobs worth $15.2 million to Juneau

tourism.jpg JUNEAU -- A new report says the cruise ship industry generated the equivalent of 748 year-round jobs in Juneau with a payroll of $15.2 million in 1999. Juneau’s share accounted for nearly half of the jobs the industry created in four Southeast towns studied.

The report, The Economic Impacts of the Cruise Industry in Southeast Alaska, examined spending, tax revenue and jobs associated with the industry in Juneau, Ketchikan, Sitka and Haines during the 1999 tourist season.

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