Movers & Shakers 10/18/15

Crowley Maritime Corp. has awarded Crowley Scholarships to four University of Alaska Fairbanks students: Allyson Wukovich, Isaac Peacock, Ashley Johnson and Gabriel Smith. Chosen for their academic achievements and meeting other scholarship criteria, each received $2,500 toward tuition from Crowley. Preferences for Crowley-funded UAF scholarships are given to students from rural Alaska from Crowley-served communities throughout the state. Wukovich, who is from Nome, is working toward a biology major with a concentration in cell and molecular biology. After graduation, she’s interested in working at a hospital lab to identify risk and prevention of certain disorders. In addition to her studies, Wukovich is an intern at the Norton Sound Regional Hospital laboratory. Peacock, from Kotzebue, is a criminal justice major going into his sophomore year at UAF. Upon graduation, he is interested in staying in the Kotzebue area and serving his community as a police officer. Johnson is a junior from Bethel, and is a rural development major. She attended the Rural Alaskans Honor Institute in 2012 and is interested in working in a job that benefits Alaska and its rural communities. Smith, from Nome, is a freshman working towards a degree in wildlife biology and conservation. In addition to his studies, he works for the Norton Sound Economic Development Corp. as a fisheries technician. After his time at UAF, Smith plans to stay in Alaska and become a wildlife biologist for Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

John Frison, an airfield maintenance mechanic at Fairbanks International Airport, was awarded the National Association of State Aviation Officials Most Innovative State Award for his design of “Yeti,” a snow and ice crusher. As airports across the nation adapt to changing climates, the team at FAI came up with a unique idea to improve the removal of ice and compacted snow. Frison took the idea behind commercial icebreakers and designed an icebreaking machine named the Yeti. The Yeti fractures ice on runways and taxiways by creating pockets in the ice allowing deicing chemicals to access the underlying asphalt faster. Not only does the Yeti crush ice and snow more efficiently, but it costs the state nearly 50 percent less to manufacture than it would cost to purchase a similar commercial product.

Delta Fettes has joined AECOM’s Anchorage office as a project management specialist to support financial and contractual project requirements. Fettes has 16 years of experience in project accounting and coordination. She is a versatile professional with diverse skills in maintaining vendor, client and executive relationships, as well as in collaboration, analysis and management. Most recently, she performed project accounting and coordination for an Alaska Native corporation in Alaska. In this role, she will be responsible for supporting environmental, engineering, planning and permitting projects in Alaska.

Hattenburg Dilley & Linnell Geotechnical Department continues to broaden its geotechnical and geological expertise with several recent additions. Doug P. Simon, PE is a professional civil engineer and leads the Geotechnical Department. Simon holds a master’s degree in geological engineering and has 14 years of geotechnical engineering and hydrogeology experience. David S. Crotsley, a professional geologist with a background in engineering geology, recently joined HDL. Crotsley holds a bachelor’s degree in geology. He brings eight years of experience conducting investigations for bridges, roadways, tunnels, buildings, reclaimed mine sites, and other civil works projects. John Fritz has 40 years of geological experience specializing in material source studies, and holds a bachelor’s degree in geological sciences. Fritz has extensive experience in permit acquisition for materials sites, and in the investigation and resolution of slope stability failures in rock cuts, soil slopes, and streambank erosion and stabilization. Prior to joining HDL, Fritz served as regional geologist for the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Central Region. Vernon D. Pate, EIT, performs geotechnical analysis and recommendations on projects throughout Alaska since joining HDL in 2011. Pate holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering.  Pate designs piles and helical piers, as well as conducts slope stability analysis for various projects. He also performs inspection and construction materials testing, and trains inspectors to perform material testing. Jeremy Dvorak, EIT, recently joined HDL as an engineering assistant, and holds a bachelor’s degree in geological engineering. Dvorak brings a background in geotechnical engineering and geology conducting geotechnical investigations for buildings, communication towers, and roadways. Lorie M. Dilley, PhD, PE, CPG, earned her doctorate in geology with her thesis on “Fluid Inclusion Strategraphy, A New Method of Geothermal Reservoir Assessment.” Dilley is currently focused on services as a principal investigator on federal geothermal projects. She continues to provide quality control reviews, and serves as a geotechnical specialist for the department.

Last week the Alaska Support Industry Alliance held its annual meeting and board elections at the Hotel Captain Cook. Pete Stokes with Petrotechnical Resources of Alaska became the Alliance board president for 2015-16 and the membership elected six directors to the board. Nick Karnos with Lynden International and Brad Osborne with NANA Oilfield Services ran as incumbents and were reelected to the board. The membership elected four new board members, including Kelly Droop with CH2M, Cathy Duxbury with Udelhoven Oilfield Systems Service, Dale Kissee with CONAM Construction Company, and Tom Walsh with Petrotechnical Resources of Alaska. Earlier in the week, the Fairbanks Chapter of the Alliance also elected Genevieve Schok with Flowline as their representative to the statewide board. All directors elected will serve a three-year term.

Updated: 
10/14/2015 - 1:51pm

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