Salmons packs more omega-3s than tuna's 'Viagra of the Sea'

PHOTO/Ed Bennett/AJOC

KODIAK -- The omega-3 fatty acids found in fish have been credited with everything from reducing heart attacks and some cancers to improving eyesight. Now, the U.S. Tuna Foundation is gleefully comparing canned tuna to "Viagra of the Sea."

The group was referring to a new book by dietitian Ellen Albertson, "Temptations, Igniting the Pleasure and Power of Aphrodisiacs," which claims that diet changes can "awaken a sleepy libido."

Albertson says one way to improve your love life is to eat more tuna fish sandwiches. In reviewing the book, the February issue of Prevention Magazine said: "If you use white albacore tuna, you up your intake of omega-3 fats. More and more researchers now believe that omega-3s help ward off depression, surely one of the worst enemies of feeling sexy."

Thus the conclusion that eating more canned tuna lifts your spirits, resulting in a better love life. Canned tuna is the most widely consumed seafood product in the United States.

Alaska’s salmon industry could easily ride on the coattails of the tuna folks’ sexy claims. For more than a decade, reports by health scientists all list salmon as containing more omega-3s than tuna. International Health News, for example, states that all fish are not created equal, and it’s important to choose fish with high levels of polyunsaturated fat.

"Salmon scores well here. By comparison, albacore tuna and cod have considerably less of the good fatty acids and may not produce the result you need," a recent report states.

Fatty acids are basic units of fat molecules, arranged as chains of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Fats are mixtures of different fatty acids. Essential fatty acids are not made by the body, but must be supplied by the diet. Omega-3 fatty acids are highly polyunsaturated and are found mostly in higher-fat fish, such as salmon. It’s estimated that 85 percent or more of the people in the Western world are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids.

If canned tuna can turn you on, eating canned salmon should result in a sexual revolution.

Unwanted aliens

Bio-invaders cost billions of dollars in damage to marine ecosystems, and if they take hold, in some cases, they can eliminate native marine and plant species. The unwanted aliens are, for the most part, tiny hitchhikers that are dumped along with the ballast waters of ships that traverse the world’s oceans. They are credited with being involved in 70 percent of native aquatic species extinctions in the last 100 years.

Cornell University scientists reported three years ago that more than 30,000 non-native species cost the United States roughly $123 billion a year in economic loss. This includes $35.5 billion for alien weeds, $20 billion for insects, $19 billion for rats and $3 billion for zebra mussels alone.

A more recent report by the Pew Oceans Commission said, "At least 7,000 different species of marine life are likely transported each day around the world. ... Ballast water carrying this wide array of non-native life arrives in the U.S. at the rate of 2 million gallons per hour."

Studies around the world reveal a remarkable array of invaders, representing all of the major and most of the smaller groups of life. Certain viruses and the bacteria that cause cholera have also been detected in ballast water. The commission urged the government to quickly develop mandatory programs to attack the problem.

There are some regulations already on the books to prevent introduction of exotic species into U.S. waters, but they are largely voluntary and mostly ignored. The Invasive Species Act of 1996 provided ships entering American ports with a three year window to undertake a voluntary program whereby coastal derived ballast water would be exchanged on the high seas, followed by re-ballasting with midocean water. The program went into effect in July 1999; however, during the first year only 12,170 of the 58,000 vessels arriving in U.S. ports had filed a mandatory reporting form.

Attempts to stave off these stowaways have included in-hull filtration systems, heat treatments and biocides, all of which are either too expensive or harmful to the environment, or both. Now, the Fish Information Service reports that a group of industrial engineers at Sumitomo Heavy Industries in Japan has come up with a simple solution.

The one element that sustains safe passage for the invasive stowaways, and which also promotes hull corrosion, is oxygen. Pumping nitrogen into the ballast tanks would displace the oxygen. One test showed that after introducing nitrogen for two days, the diminished oxygen environment resulted in significant population reduction: 79 percent of the tubeworms, 82 percent of the zebra mussels and 97 percent of the green crabs.

On top of that, the rust and corrosion rate dropped by 90 percent, which translates to an average annual reduction in maintenance costs of $70,000.

"It’s not perfect and it doesn’t kill everything," Mario Tamburri of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute told FIS. "But until international law mandates that ballast water contain no living organisms, why not require this technology that saves industry money and is also good for the environment?"

Alaska’s waters are not exempt from the foreign invaders.

"Up to a dozen species from Asia have been identified in the waters of Valdez and Prince William Sound from all the oil tankers over the years," said Bob Pierkowski, former head of Alaska Department of Fish and Game’s Mariculture Division.

He added that state biologists are on the lookout for green crabs, which since 1990 have migrated from California to Washington. The tiny crab have wiped out all other crab they’ve encountered, including much larger species like Dungeness.

"We expect to see them in Southeast Alaska. It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when," Pierkowski said.

Interestingly, the Pew report considers the thousands of Atlantic salmon escaping from fish farms in the Pacific Northwest among the bio-invaders.

 

Updated: 
11/12/2016 - 4:48pm

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