Chicken of the Sea's pinks in a pouch bode well for Alaska salmon

Photos courtesy of Erosion Control of Alaska

The new line of pinks in a pouch being launched by Chicken of the Sea is good news for Alaska’s struggling salmon industry, as virtually all of the fish will come from Alaska waters.

The San Diego-based international corporation announced that it would begin shipping premium pink salmon in 7.1 ounce vacuum-packed, foil pouches to U.S. retailers starting in January. The product follows on the heels of Tuna Salad Kits, which Chicken of the Sea introduced earlier this year. And as with its tuna, the company will support the launch of its new pink salmon pouches with a multimillion dollar, all-media advertising and promotional campaign.

Chicken of the Sea pioneered skinless/boneless pink salmon in cans in 1985, and 80 percent of that product is eaten in the United States, said marketing director Van Effner. He added that the company buys millions of pounds of frozen pinks from Alaska each year for the canned pack, and they’ve already increased purchases to accommodate the new pouched product, a trend Chicken of the Sea expects to continue.

"From time to time we buy fish from Russia if we run short of product, but more than 95 percent of the pink salmon we purchase comes from Alaska. We prefer doing business in Alaska," Effner said in a phone interview.

Effner, who has made many visits to Alaska’s remote fishing sites, had some hopeful words for the wild salmon industry.

"Like you, we’re in it for the long haul. We want it to work out for everyone. We’re committed to new products and into seafood in a big way, and that’s what Alaska is all about," he said.

Actually, Chicken of the Sea is stealing a bit of Alaska’s thunder with its pouched salmon product. Kodiak-based Alaska Pacific Seafoods has been producing Gourmet Pink Salmon in a Pouch for six years and selling it primarily to food distributors across the United States and overseas.

Alien aquatic weed alert

The Fish and Wildlife also reports that a rapidly growing, invasive aquatic weed new to the United States could harm fishing, hunting, hydropower production and other industries. Salvinia molesta is already causing havoc in 12 states from California to North Carolina, and could spread to coastal inland waters of Oregon and Washington.

"The weed floats on the water surface and grows at phenomenal rates, doubling the area it covers in less than a week," the agency told the Fish Info service. "Mats of Salvinia molesta may reach three feet thick, blocking sunlight to waters below and killing plants, bugs and fish. Small lakes could be covered in a matter of days, water works clogged, and eradication is no easy matter."

Fish and Wildlife added: "Mechanical removal is nearly impossible, given the dense mats weigh around 36 tons per acre; shredding plants is not effective either given the plant’s ability to continue to grow from the smallest living portion. Herbicides have some promise, but are costly and most effective on younger plants and require repeated treatments, which underscores the need for the first line of defense: prevention."

Lobsters as stolen property

Police in Maine got a lot more than they bargained for when they recently stopped a car for speeding. According to the Bangor News, "Around 11 p.m. Wednesday, police stopped Doreen Beerman of Rockland for speeding and discovered 136 unrestrained live lobsters inside her car."

Beerman, who was celebrating her 44th birthday, was arrested for allegedly operating a car while intoxicated and driving without a license. The police believed the lobsters were part of 245 pounds stolen from Maine Coast Seafood.

Beerman was also charged with receiving stolen property and possession of lobster without a license. After her arrest, the roughly 200 pounds of live lobsters were removed from the car and put into crates, awaiting their rightful owner.

Kodiak-based free-lance writer Laine Welch can be reached via e-mail at ([email protected]).

 

Updated: 
11/20/2016 - 5:11pm

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