Movers and Shakers for June 23

Alaska USA Federal Credit Union hired Tim Woolston as its new senior vice president of marketing. Woolston joins the credit union with more than 30 years of experience in the marketing, advertising and communications industries. His previous experience includes president and owner of a marketing and public relations firm, corporate communications director, and as managing editor and anchor for Channel 2 News in Anchorage. Woolston will oversee Alaska USA’s marketing and member engagement strategies, including research and analysis, brand oversight, product and service marketing, and membership growth.

Keith Champagne will take on a new role as leader of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Nanooks athletics program. Champagne, who currently serves as vice chancellor for student affairs, will assume the duties of athletics director, as well as continue to serve as the leader of UAF’s student affairs division. He will take over for Sterling Steward, who stepped down June 11. In his new role, Champagne plans to focus more on fundraising, marketing and community engagement. Champagne has a bachelor’s degree in communications public relations from Loyola University, a master’s degree in communications, training and development from Clarion University of Pennsylvania, and a doctorate in educational leadership and policy studies from the University of Washington. His doctoral work focused on intercollegiate athletics leadership and sports management. Prior to joining the leadership team at UAF, he served in a variety of athletics and student services leadership positions at Central Washington University, including chief diversity officer for intercollegiate athletics and interim athletics director. He is a graduate of the Sports Management Institute and a member of the Sports Lawyers Association.

Karlin Itchoak has joined The Wilderness Society as Alaska state director and will be expanding his role as a spokesperson for our organization. Karlin has undergraduate degrees in Alaska Native studies and political science from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and a law degree from Gonzaga University. He most recently worked for the Ukpeagvik Inupiat Native Corp. as chief administrative and legal officer. His other professional experience includes directing Alaska rural and indigenous programs at the Institute of the North; helping run the gubernatorial campaign of Ethan Berkowitz; clerking for Alaska Supreme Court Chief Justice Alexander O. Bryner, producing economic development plans for the Bering Strait region while serving for the nonprofit Native corporation Kawerak Inc.; and co-founding a consulting company focused on Arctic business relations, partnerships, and diplomacy. Karlin has served as elected president of the Nome Eskimo community Tribal council. He is currently on the boards of the Alaska Center and Alaska Institute for Justice. He teaches a segment of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act to federal, state and Tribal employees.

Rasmuson Foundation President and CEO Diane Kaplan has received a prestigious national leadership award from Grantmakers in Health, a nonprofit that helps funders work to improve health of all people. The Terrance Keenan Leadership Award in Health Philanthropy, named after an executive who led the field for more than four decades, was presented to Kaplan June 13 in Seattle. Kaplan became the Foundation’s first employee in 1995 and since 2001 has served as president and CEO. Rasmuson Foundation last year launched an initiative to target homelessness in part through new partnerships for housing and supports designed for individuals who have been on the street. On the issue of alcohol, the foundation convened leaders in 2009 to work on how to address a problem so big. The result was Recover Alaska, which aims to reduce alcohol’s harm through public health messaging, policy changes and a shift in social norms around drinking. In 2000, the foundation worked with Tribal health partners to establish a groundbreaking dental health aide therapist program, which sends trained therapists to rural communities to provide a variety of oral health services. She currently serves on the boards of the International Foundation for Research in Experimental Economics, The Alaska Community Foundation, and United States Artists.

Channel 2, KTUU-TV was honored with three regional Emmys, including the most prestigious award for Overall Excellence at the NATAS Northwest Regional Emmy Awards in Seattle. The category is a year-long review of the entire station and its contributions to the community. Nominees included stations serving coverage areas with a higher population than the entire state of Alaska, such as Portland and Seattle. In 2018, that meant delivering immediate coverage online following the magnitude 7.1 earthquake, and bringing television viewers some of the first aerials of the damage. A KTUU News team embedded with the military in Afghanistan to deliver a series of special reports titled Operation Afghanistan. KTUU also traveled to China for a series examining the trade relationships and economic impact between the two regions. The station’s commitment to covering Alaska includes travel throughout the state and a bureau in Juneau during the legislative sessions. While more than 22 hours of news coverage each week, KTUU is built on providing a community service. From volunteer work to participating in fundraisers for non-profits, station employees appeared at more than 85 local events last year.

Updated: 
06/19/2019 - 9:30am

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